Your safety and well-being are our top priorities. Our office is open and staffed to serve you. We are taking measures to ensure that our office is thoroughly cleaned and safe for our clients. We will continue to offer our services via phone, email, and Zoom. Harris & Literski is committed to slowing the spread of COVID-19 while continuing to be the law firm you can depend on.

Your safety and well-being are our top priorities. Our office is open and staffed to serve you. We are taking measures to ensure that our office is thoroughly cleaned and safe for our clients. We will continue to offer our services via phone, email, and Zoom. Harris & Literski is committed to slowing the spread of COVID-19 while continuing to be the law firm you can depend on.

Are millennials bucking family law trends?

| Nov 1, 2018 | Family Law |

From ruining industries to taking on too much debt, millennials in Michigan tend to take a lot of flak for their life choices. However, there may not be much to criticize in the latest industry they are accused of disrupting — the divorce industry. For a number of reasons, this generation of young adults are encountering fewer family law issues than their parents.

Between 2008 and 2016, the divorce rate fell by 18 percent. While some think that fewer divorces is the result of fewer marriages, experts caution against this assumption. Instead, it may be down to millennials attitudes toward marriage. While baby boomers tended to marry young no matter their life circumstances, many young adults today first establish themselves in their careers before going on to tie the knot. So what does having a career have to do with declining divorce rates?

Experts say that, in general, many of the young adults who are getting married right now have higher levels of education, are financially stable and have already-established careers. When these factors are all in place, it can make getting married and staying married much easier. This trend of delaying marriage until millennials feel prepared may also be a natural consequence of the high divorce rate in their parents’ generation.

However, a declining divorce rate does not mean that it is zero, and no one should feel obligated to stay in an unhappy marriage simply because their peers are divorcing less frequently. Michigan family law can be complicated, though, and it is understandable for some couples to feel overwhelmed at the prospect of ending their marriage. Careful guidance from an experienced attorney is usually helpful at addressing those concerns.

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